Turnbull Clan Association

  • IX. The Scots in Ulster

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    Norman Turnbull,
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    After the Battle of Culloden the way of life was never the same for the border clans. Ever since the 1600 centuries, hangings and persecutions on the border people had been rife. Many name changes had taken place to avoid persecution. For example; Turnbull became, Trimble, Trammel, Trummel, Trimell, Trumble and so on.
    Many young men formed what we know as the Border Reivers. This was a way of life and survival for them. Some tried to make a living from farming. Border land is made up of hills and rocky ground and not suitable for arable farming, so livestock was the only type of possible means of a livelihood.
    The dawn of the Ulster Scots and before the Plantation of Ulster, before the flight of the Earl’s, two Ayrshire Scots, James Hamilton and Hugh Montgomery pioneered the first large-scale settlement from the Lowlands of Scotland to County Antrim and County Down. Starting in May 1606, over 10,000 Lowland Scots made the three-hour voyage across the North Channel, transforming east Ulster into an industrial powerhouse.

  • Nova Scotia & Prince Edward Island the "New World" Scotland

    NSNova pic2

    NSNova Map1In 1621, King James I of England, renamed the islands off the eastern coast of Canada from Acadia to Nova Scotia. Eight years later groups of Scots settled at Charlesfort, near Port Royal, and at Rosemar, on Cape Breton Island.
    From the 1770’s to the 1830’s, a large emigration to these islands began. Nova Scotia became a British colony with new settlers. It was a promise of a better life for the Scottish Highlanders as land ownership in Scotland was rare. They were promised 200 acres of land when they arrived. Some were allocated much more.
    This new land had been recovered from the French settlers, who had been forcibly removed by the British a little earlier. Most were returned to Europe, however, some settlers went westward to new uncharted territory now known as Quebec. Others escaped and went into hiding until the pressure of being deported was over.
    The New Scottish and Irish settlers were located around the Bay of Fundy, Cape Breton Island and along the coast of the Northumberland shores. Yet another island also became very popular for emigrants. This was the northern and nearby Prince Edward Island. The Gaels made their communities very homogenous and, as a result, made up a large and culturally diverse Scottish influence throughout these islands.

  • V. The Battle of Philiphaugh

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    The Battle of Philiphaugh

    by Norman Turnbull
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    The English civil War was really a British Civil War as it obviously embraced Wales, dragged in Ireland and had profound consequences for Scotland. After all Charles I was king of Scotland as well as England and he had his supporters and opponents both North and South of the Border.

     

    philiphaugh shots
    A permanent reminder of the Battle of Philiphaugh, this memorial plaque in remembrance of the Convenaters rests on what was once land given to William ‘Rule’ Turnebull by Robert the Bruce.

    Philiphaugh was not the usual English v Scots conflict but was a Scottish battle fought on Scottish soil between two sets of Scots; Royalists (supporters of the king) and Covenanters (those who supported the Covenant of 1638 pledged to protect the Presbyterian religion).

    In 1643, the Scottish Parliament decided to give military assistance to the English Parliamentarians, on the assumption that a Parliamentary victory would be in the best interests of Scotland.

    Although previously a supporter of the Covenanters, James Graham, Marquis of Montrose, remained loyal to the king and became the main champion of the Royalist cause north of the Border. In 1645, after a serious of stunning victories against the Covenanters, Charles I ordered him to march south to the Borders.

  • III. The Troubled Border Years

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    The Troubled Years in the Borders

    by Norman Turnbull
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    When Will-O-Rule saved King Robert the Bruce’s life in 1313, he would have been part of the Douglas Company, probably a small baron, and maybe even because of his stature and build, Douglas’s champion. He would most likely be in his early 20’s at this point, which means he would have been born around 1290. His father and any older brothers, however, could well have fought along side Wallace at Stirling Bridge and Falkirk in 1297 and 1298, as the Douglases did. It’s a fact that boys as young as 11 did bloody their swords and axes.

  • II. The Forest, Where it All Began

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    rule valley
    The Rule Valley today is beautiful and lush, but one must not forget that life in the early days was very difficult and harsh.

    by Norman Turnbull
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    Have you ever thought what the meaning of a name is and what it can mean to you? I never gave it much thought myself, until a few years ago, when I received a letter through my door. It was an invitation to attend a gathering of the Clan Turnbull at a small village called Denholm, just outside Hawick. It was here that I met up with other people with the Turnbull name. This started my curiosity. I made up my mind there and then that I wanted to find out more about my self and where I came from, so I joined the Turnbull Clan Association. In my lifetime, I have travelled to many places but never settled until I returned to the borders where, for once, I felt at peace with my self. Not knowing why this should be, I took up employment, as a hill shepherd, on Harwood Estate, (the home of one of the Elliot family.) Harwood Estate was, at one time part of Turnbull land, which we will talk about later.

  • I. The Beginning, Rule to Turnbull

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    rule valley
    The Rule Valley today is beautiful and lush, but one must not forget that life in the early days was very difficult and harsh.

    by Norman Turnbull
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    Have you ever thought what the meaning of a name is and what it can mean to you? I never gave it much thought myself, until a few years ago, when I received a letter through my door. It was an invitation to attend a gathering of the Clan Turnbull at a small village called Denholm, just outside Hawick. It was here that I met up with other people with the Turnbull name. This started my curiosity. I made up my mind there and then that I wanted to find out more about my self and where I came from, so I joined the Turnbull Clan Association. In my lifetime, I have travelled to many places but never settled until I returned to the borders where, for once, I felt at peace with my self. Not knowing why this should be, I took up employment, as a hill shepherd, on Harwood Estate, (the home of one of the Elliot family.) Harwood Estate was, at one time part of Turnbull land, which we will talk about later.

  • VIII. Covenanters of the 17th Century

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    Covenanters of the 17th Century

    by Norman Turnbull
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    The Covenanters were a Scottish Presbyterian movement that played an important part in the history of Scotland, and to a lesser extent in that of England and Ireland, during the 17th century. Presbyterian denominations tracing their history to the Covenanters and often incorporating the name continue the ideas and traditions in Scotland and internationally.

    They derive their name from the Scots term (covenant) for a band or legal document. There were two important covenants in Scottish history, the National Covenant and the Solemn League and Covenant.

    The Solemn League and Covenant was an agreement between the Scottish Covenanters and the leaders of the English Parliamentarians. It was agreed to in 1643, during the first English Civil War.

  • VI. Turnbull Borders Strongholds

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    The Turnbull Strongholds In The Borders

     

    bedrule castle
    Shenachie Norman Turnbull has acquired this to scale recreation of the original Bedrule Castle and is working with others to restore the foundation to its original form.

    by Norman Turnbull
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    Turnbulls were once a very powerful Border Clan.

    The Castle at Bedrule was a well fortifiable dwelling for the Turnbull Clan. The castle stood on high ground at the head of the Rule Valley. To the right of the castle at the other side of the river Rule and to the left over the high hill of Ruberslaw can be seen Fatlips Castle another part of the Turnbull Stronghold in the valley.

  • IV. Border Battles and Conflicts

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    Border Battles and Conflicts

    by Norman Turnbull
    Turnbull Clan High Shenachie

    Very few Border Battles have been recorded without one or more of the Turnbull’s being implicated and, indeed, when the occasion arose, the whole of the Turnbull Clan rallied to the Douglases, and their neighbours, in defending their country and their homeland, besides relishing any opportunity in battling with the “auld enemy” over the Border.

     

    battle of otterburn
    Today a memorial sign commemorates the Battle of Otterburn between the Percies and Douglases.

    The battle of Otterburn on 19 August 1388 was one of the classic conflicts in the long feud between two of the most powerful of the Border families; the Percies on the English side and the Douglases on the Scottish side. Taking advantage of the fact that the English king Richard II was a minor, James, 2nd Earl of Douglas, led a raiding party into England in 1388.

  • Ebenezer Church History

    New South Wales, Australia

    In reference to Ebenezer Church Celebrates 200th Year, Bullseye, Volume 9, Issue 8, October, 2009


    Of those eight free seebenezer250cttlers who arrived in Australia on the Coromandel in 1802, six were Scottish.  Only John Howe and William Stubbs were considered to be English. John Howe was from Redbourne in Lancashire & William Stubbs ancestry is not known, though he may have been from Northumberland of Scottish descent, as was the case with many many Northumbrians in the 17/18th centuries.

    Of the fifteen families involved in the construction of the old church 1808/09, it's a fact that they all became related, by marriage and birth, one way or another. In those early days there were very few young people in the colony, so choosing a partner depended on one’s means of transport. It was either a boat up and down the river or by horse, if you could afford to own one.

  • The Old Manse Bedrule

    Bedrule, birthplace of William Turnbull, (Bishop of Glasgow from 1448 to 1454)

    By CATRIONA FINDLAY

    Bedrule Kirk

    "From the pavements, from the windows of houses, and from trams, buses and motor cars, whose, occupants for once cheerfully, acquiesced in a traffic hold-up. Glasgow folk watched a long chain of fire pass on Saturday night from the Cathedral to the heights of Gilmore hill." Thus the writer in the Glasgow Herald of January 8, 1951. described; a seen that had its beginnings over 500 years earlier, in Roxburghshire. For in the tiny hamlet of Bedrule, between Hawick and Jedburgh, was born William Turnbull who became 25th Bishop of Glasgow from 1448 to 1454, and the man responsible for the founding of Glasgow University in 1451. So it was appropriate that when the University was, celebrating its 500th centenary, a thread of fire symbolising the torch of learning should have been carried by a relay of 12  runners over the 100 miles from the Borders to the city.

  • Graves in the Kirkyard Bedrule, Index and Monumental Inscriptions

     

    Bedrule Kirk

    The following was typed from original sheets compiled by G "Ormie" Wood by Brian Turnbull

  • The Old Church Bedrule

    An excerpt from, The Churches and Churchyards of Teviotdale.
    By James Robson. 1893.

    Bedrule KirkConcerning the old church of Bedrule we know very little. About the earliest notice refers to 1479 when James Newton was parson of Bedrule. It is recorded also, that in 1482, James Rutherford of that ilk obtained a charter of the patronage. Subsequently to the Reformation. it was attached to the barony of "Edgarstoun", and belonged to the Earl of Traquair, who ,had at the same time the lands of Rutherford. The present building occupies an elevated situation on the right bark of the river Rule, two miles above its junction with the Teviot. It was restored in 1876. Only a portion o' the old walls remains, while a vestry and porch were added. The surrounding scenery is exceedingly fine. From the church an excellent view is to be had up the water to Hobkirk, over to Cavers parish, and across the Teviot to Minto. From the vestry window is obtained one of the finest views in the South of Scotland, including the beautifully wooded estate of Wells, which lines the skirts of Ruberslaw, while the dark hill itself towers up far above, and its rugged peak from this point presents the most picturesque appearance.

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